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Keynote speakers

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balanis bio prof.camnguyen

robertschober

Constantine A.Balanis

Regent's Professor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University.

Tempe, AZ 85287-5706
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

http://balanis.faculty.asu.edu

Cam Nguyen

Texas Instruments Endowed Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Texas A&M University

College Station, Texas 77843-3128, U.S.A.
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

http://www.ece.tamu.edu/~sics

Robert Schober

Chair for Digital Communications

Alexander von Humboldt Professor

Department of Electrical, Electronics,

and Communication Engineering (EEI)

Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

Schloßplatz 4, 91054 Erlangen, Germany

Email:schober(at)LNT.de

http://goo.gl/ivrGMZ

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SMART ANTENNA: TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATING ANTENNAS, DSP, COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKS


by Constantine A. Balanis, Regents's Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University.


Abstract: As the demand for mobile communications is constantly increasing, the need for improved capacity, greater coverage and higher transmission quality rises. Thefore, a more efficient use of the radio spectrum is required. Smart antenna systems are capable of efficiently utilizing the radio spectrum, and they are a promise for an effective solution to meet the desired performance demands in network and communication systems. Smart antenna technology has been considered for mobile platforms such as automobiles, cellular phones (mobile units), and laptops.


Smart antennas integrate many technologies, including antennas, digital signal processing, communications and networks. The advancement and integration of the characteristics of each of these areas is critical to the efficiency and performance of a communication system channel, as measured by Bit-Error-Rate (BER) and network Throughput. This presentation reviews the basic principles of smart antennas, and it presents and compares the BER and Throughput of different antenna array geometries, such as the uniform rectangular array (URA) and uniform circular array (UCA). Although the iterative LMS algorithm has been primarily used in the modeling and simulations, its contrast to the RLS will be indicated and compared.


Biography: Constantine A. Balanis (S'62 - M'68 - SM'74 - F'86 - LF'2004) received the BSEE degree from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, in 1964, the MEE degree from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, in 1966, the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, in l969, and an Honorary Doctorate from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH) in 2004.

From 1964-1970 he was with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA, and from 1970-1983 he was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Since 1983 he has been with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, where he is now Regents' Professor. His research interests are in low- and high-frequency methods for antennas propagation, and scattering; smart antennas for wireless communication; penetration and scattering of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF); and multipath propagation. He received the 2000 IEEE Third Millennium Medal, the 1997 Outstanding Graduate Mentor Award of Arizona State University, the 1992 Special Professionalism Award from the IEEE Phoenix Section, the 1989 IEEE Region 6 Individual Achievement Award, and the 1987-1988 Graduate Teaching Excellence Award, School of Engineering, Arizona State University.

Dr. Balanis is a Life Fellow of the IEEE, and a member Sigma Xi, Electromagnetics Academy, Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and Phi Kappa Phi. He has served as Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (1974-1977) and the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1981- 1984), as Editor of the Newsletter for the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (1982-1983), as Second Vice-President (1984) and member of the Administrative Committee (1984-85) of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, and as Chairman of the Distinguished Lecturer Program of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (1988-1991), Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (2003-), and member of the AdCom (1992-95, 1996-1999) of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society. In addition, he served for the IEEE Upper Monongahela Subsection of the IEEE Pittsburgh Section as: Chairman (1978-79), Vice-Chairman (1977-78), Secretary-Treasurer (1975-76), and Delegate-at-large (1974-75). He is the author of Antenna Theory: Analysis and Design (Wiley; 1982, 1997, 2005) and Advanced Engineering Electromagnetics (Wiley, 1989).

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RADIO FREQUENCY INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: THE BACKBONE OF MODERN WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, RADAR AND SENSING


by Cam Nguyen, Texas Instruments Endowed Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University.


Abstract: Wireless communications, radar and sensing play an “essential” and “inevitable” role in the life of every human being living in the present information era, and are so vital that the World cannot function properly without. Building these systems completely in “single chips” approaching millimeter levels is no longer a “dream”, but becoming a “reality”. Silicon-based Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits (RFICs), working within the RF/electromagnetic (EM) spectrum to several hundred GHz, are making this reality possible.


RFICs are the backbone of modern wireless communications, radar and sensing systems, enabling low-cost, small-size and high-performance single-chip solution. Advanced RF wireless systems and, in turn, RFICs are relevant not only to commercial and military applications, but also to national infrastructures. This importance is even more pronounced as the development of civilian technologies becomes increasingly important to the national economic growth. New applications utilizing RFIC technology continue to emerge - spanning across the EM spectrum - from ultra-wideband to millimeter-wave and sub-millimeter-wave ultra-high-capacity wireless communications; from sensing abnormal human body condition, diagnosing it and imaging the effect to early detection of cancer and un-attended health monitoring and examination; from sensing for airport security to through-wall imaging and inventory for gas and oil; and from detection and inspection of buried mine, unexploded ordnance (UXO), underground oil and gas pipes to wireless power transmission and data communications for smart wells, etc. While the development of low-frequency silicon chips, the beloved sister of RFICs, is relatively straightforward, although indeed time-consuming, the development of RFICs (and single-chip systems) is very challenging, particularly RFICs operating in the millimeter-wave spectrum approaching multi-GHz. In this talk, we will address this important RFIC technology - from basics to advanced developments - for modern wireless communications, radar and sensing.

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Biography: Dr. Cam Nguyen is the Texas Instruments Endowed Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. He was the Program Director at the U.S. National Science Foundation during 2003-2004, leading and managing the Foundation’s research programs in RF and wireless technologies. Over the past 36 years, including twelve years in the defense industry at TRW (now Northrop-Grumman), Hughes Aircraft (now Raytheon), Martin Marietta (now Lockheed-Martin), Aeroject Electrosystems, and ITT Gilfillan, Prof. Nguyen has led numerous RF projects for wireless communications, radar and sensing up to 220 GHz. He has published 6 books, six book chapters, over 265 papers and received numerous awards. Professor Nguyen is a Fellow of the IEEE.

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WIRELESS POWERED COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS: OVERVIEW, RECENT RESULTS, AND CHALLENGES


by

Robert Schober, Chair for Digital Communications,Alexander von Humboldt Professor, Department of Electrical, Electronics, and Communication Engineering (EEI), Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU)

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Abstract: Although wireless power transfer (WPT) has been first proposed by Nikola Tesla more than one hundred years ago, the application of this concept as a means to facilitate perpetual energy supply for wireless communication systems has emerged only recently. In fact, WPT and simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT) are now seen by many as promising new technologies that may make the distributed nodes of short range wireless networks independent of external energy sources. In this talk, we will first discuss the benefits, limitations, and possible applications of WPT/SWIPT systems. In the main part of the talk, we will investigate the implications of WPT/SWIPT on the design of communication systems. In particular, we will discuss the impact of SWIPT on relay selection and secure communication. We will also study the performance of WPT systems with energy storage capability at the energy harvesting node. In the last part of the talk, we will elaborate on the challenges that have to be overcome to make WPT/SWIPT practical and suggest some topics for future research.

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Biography: Robert Schober received the Diplom (Univ.) and the Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in 1997 and 2000, respectively. From May 2001 to April 2002 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto, Canada, sponsored by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). From 2002 to 2012, he was with the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada. Since January 2012 he is an Alexander von Humboldt Professor and the Chair for Digital Communication at the Friedrich Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Germany. His research interests fall into the broad areas of Communication Theory, Wireless Communications, and Statistical Signal Processing.

Dr. Schober received several awards for his work including the 2002 Heinz Maier–Leibnitz Award of the German Science Foundation (DFG), the 2004 Innovations Award of the Vodafone Foundation for Research in Mobile Communications, the 2006 UBC Killam Research Prize, the 2007 Wilhelm Friedrich Bessel Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the 2008 Charles McDowell Award for Excellence in Research from UBC, a 2011 Alexander von Humboldt Professorship, and a 2012 NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Fellowship. In addition, he received best paper awards from the German Information Technology Society (ITG), the European Association for Signal, Speech and Image Processing (EURASIP), IEEE WCNC 2012, IEEE Globecom 2011, IEEE ICUWB 2006, the International Zurich Seminar on Broadband Communications, and European Wireless 2000. Dr. Schober is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Communications and the Chair of the Steering Committee of the IEEE Transactions on Molecular, Biological, and Multi-Scale Communications.



 

Conference Secretariat

Trinh Xuan-Dung

dung.trinh@hcmut.edu.vn

Co-organized by
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